Bank Vocabularies

Bank Vocabularies

This is a practical vocabulary lesson about words we use at the bank. Banking has a set of specialized vocabulary, and you may be nervous to go to the bank in an English-speaking country. But knowing some useful words will make it easy and pleasant for you. In this lesson, I will teach you the meaning of “bank teller”, “PIN”, “investments”, “account”, “deposit”, “withdraw”, and many more terms associated with going to the bank. If you want to feel more confident when going to the bank and speaking in English, watch this lesson and complete the quiz. After that, you’ll be in business!

TRANSCRIPT

Hi, everyone. I’m Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on “Bank Vocabulary”. Today, we’re going to talk about going to the bank, and the different things you can do, and the different verbs associated and nouns associated with this very common experience.

So, first, when you enter the bank, you have to “get in line” or “get in the queue”. Now, specifically, in the United States, even in Canada, we use the word “line” when you’re waiting to see someone at the bank. If you are in other parts of the world, specifically England, you can also call a line a “queue”, so you get in the queue or get in line.

Next, once it’s your turn to, you know, do your business at the bank, you see a “bank teller”. So, the name of the person who helps you at the bank is the teller. And after you see the bank teller, if you already have an account with the bank, you have to use your bank card and put in your “PIN”. Your “PIN” is your personal identification number, your code, your password. Right?

Now, once this is done, you’re ready, the bank teller can see your account. Or maybe it’s your first time and you didn’t put in a PIN, there are different things you can do and ask for when you’re at the bank. Number one, you can say: “Hi. I’d like to open an account”, or “close an account”. Now, again the two most common types of accounts at a bank are a checking account and a savings account. So your checking is your everyday spending. This is what you use your debit card for. Right? So, I’m just going to put “debit card” here. Your debit card is your bank card, and this is what you use to make payments when you go out to restaurants, movie theaters, etc.

Okay, you can also transfer money when you are at the bank. So if you’d like to move some money from your checking account, for example, to one of your other accounts, such as a savings account or maybe a joint account that you have with your partner, husband, wife, etc., you can ask to do that. You can say: “Hi. I’d like to transfer $200 from my checking account to my savings account.” And again, this is if you don’t do online banking, which solves a lot of these issues.

Now, instead of transferring money, you can also “deposit” money or “make a deposit”. This means you are putting money into your accounts. So if you, you know, receive a check from the government, for example, or maybe your workplace still gives checks (it still happens, it does), you can deposit that check. And “deposit it” means put that money into your account. You can “withdraw”. Now, “to withdraw” is to take out money. So, these two are really the most common verbs when you’re talking about exchanging money with the bank, whether you’re in the bank or at an ATM machine. So you deposit, which means you put money in; withdraw means you take money out. So you can withdraw or take out money. And the term we can also use is you can make a “withdrawal”. And you’ll see the “al” here, this means that, again, this is a noun in this case. The verb, there’s no “al” at the end; it’s just “withdraw”. Withdraw money.

You can “pay a bill”. So, again, bills are our favorite things in the world, like pay for your electricity at your house, or your television, internet, etc. Now, again, this doesn’t only have to be for those common things, because most people today, you have an automatic withdraw happens when you pay for a bill. But again, sometimes you get something where you have to go to the bank to pay the bill. If you get something from the Ministry of Transportation or something from the government, and it’s unclear what you have to do to pay something online, you can go to the bank and you can pay that bill.

Also, you can “exchange currency”. So if you are travelling somewhere and you only have money from your country, you can change that money. And again, the name for “money” in this case is “currency”, like the dollar is one type of currency, the yen is another type of currency. And you can ask the bank: “What’s your rate?” because different places, exchange offices, banks, will have different rates for your currency. So, for example, the bank might say, if I’m travelling from Canada to the United States, they might say: “95 cents per dollar.” Okay? So for every dollar that I have Canadian, I receive 95 cents American.

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